News and opinion from the Editors of The Huffington Post's Science vertical.
wtfevolution:

“So I was thinking.”
“Great, evolution.”
“Nobody really needs eyeballs and limbs and all that, right? When you get down to it, all you really need to be alive is an opening for stuff to go in and an opening for stuff to come out.”
“Well, yeah, I guess so.”
“I might try making things that way for a few million years. ‘Sea cucumbers’ and the like.”
“Okay, but it’s not just going to be, like, a tube with a mouth and an anus, is it? That sounds a little crass.”
“What if I made it pink?”
“I don’t know…”
“Oh, and also, it’s going to breathe through the butt end.”

wtfevolution:

“So I was thinking.”

“Great, evolution.”

“Nobody really needs eyeballs and limbs and all that, right? When you get down to it, all you really need to be alive is an opening for stuff to go in and an opening for stuff to come out.”

“Well, yeah, I guess so.”

“I might try making things that way for a few million years. ‘Sea cucumbers’ and the like.”

“Okay, but it’s not just going to be, like, a tube with a mouth and an anus, is it? That sounds a little crass.”

“What if I made it pink?”

“I don’t know…”

“Oh, and also, it’s going to breathe through the butt end.”

#science  #wtf evolution  #evolution  #animals  

Marijuana Study Tying Teens' Pot Use To I.Q. Drop Is Flawed, New Paper Suggests

#marijuana  #weed  #science  #IQ  #intelligence  #research  #news  #huffpost  

"Forget Jesus. The stars died so you could be here today."

– Lawrence Krauss (via psychedelic-physicist)

#science  #religion  

TRYING TO LEAVE LAB EARLY ON A FRIDAY

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

image

credit: Alex

#science  

we-are-star-stuff:

♥

Richard Dawkins lego man!

we-are-star-stuff:

Richard Dawkins lego man!

#richard dawkins  #science  #legos  

scinerds:

3D Print a Fossil With Virtual Palaeontology

Image: The combination of CT scanning and 3D printing is taking the discovery and recreation of ancient fossils into the 21st century Credit: Dave Stock
Sergio Azevedo was prospecting at an old railroad site in São Paulo state, Brazil, when he discovered the fossilised bones of an unknown animal. “Many times when you find a fossil in the field it’s impossible to determine how much of the ancient animal you have,” he says. “Sometimes you have just part of a bone or a tooth.” Azevedo has a solution to this perennial problem, which also acts as a safety net in case a stray hammer blow destroys an ancient fossil during excavation. Just scan it and print it.
His team at the National Museum of Brazil in Rio used a portable CT scanner to determine the orientation of the specimen in the ground, then they cut out a large section of rock to take back to the lab. There the encased fossil was probed using a more powerful scanner - and a 3D replica printed out in resin.
“This gives us safe access to the inner structures usually not accessible to conventional palaeontology,” Azevedo says. Their efforts were rewarded - the animal turned out to be a new species, a 75-million-year-old extinct crocodile. As well as ancient crocs, Azevedo has also produced 3D-printed replicas of dinosaurs.
“3D printing will be a step change in the science of palaeontology once the costs come down,” says Louise Leakey, who runs a virtual fossil museum, AfricanFossils.org, in conjunction with the Turkana Basin Institute and the National Museum of Kenya in Nairobi.
The method relies on an updated version of a technique called photogrammetry, which calculates the geometry of an object from photographs. To capture a 2-million-year-old Homo habilis skull, for instance, some 160 photographs of the specimen are taken from all angles. Photogrammetry software converts the images into a 3D mesh model, which can then be printed. With a CT scanner, which uses X-rays, you don’t even need to see the object with your own eyes. Fossils can be scanned while still encased in rock. The image is subjected to “virtual preparation” - software processing that digitally removes the surrounding rock.
“You can now use laser scanners to capture surface detail of delicate fossils in the field in 3D before they are excavated to provide an in situ record of a fossil or a site before it is disturbed,” says Leakey. She is the daughter of the palaeontologist Richard Leakey, and granddaughter of Mary and Louis Leakey, famous for their discoveries of ancient hominids in Olduvai Gorge in northern Kenya. Scanning and excavation on a fossil of a snake skeleton in the ground at Lake Turkana will start in June.
3D printing will be a boon for classrooms too, as accurate digital replicas can be made of the rare and inaccessible specimens that make up the fossil collections in museums, without the expense of traditional casting techniques.


I want one of these. 

scinerds:

3D Print a Fossil With Virtual Palaeontology

Image: The combination of CT scanning and 3D printing is taking the discovery and recreation of ancient fossils into the 21st century Credit: Dave Stock

Sergio Azevedo was prospecting at an old railroad site in São Paulo state, Brazil, when he discovered the fossilised bones of an unknown animal. “Many times when you find a fossil in the field it’s impossible to determine how much of the ancient animal you have,” he says. “Sometimes you have just part of a bone or a tooth.” Azevedo has a solution to this perennial problem, which also acts as a safety net in case a stray hammer blow destroys an ancient fossil during excavation. Just scan it and print it.

His team at the National Museum of Brazil in Rio used a portable CT scanner to determine the orientation of the specimen in the ground, then they cut out a large section of rock to take back to the lab. There the encased fossil was probed using a more powerful scanner - and a 3D replica printed out in resin.

“This gives us safe access to the inner structures usually not accessible to conventional palaeontology,” Azevedo says. Their efforts were rewarded - the animal turned out to be a new species, a 75-million-year-old extinct crocodile. As well as ancient crocs, Azevedo has also produced 3D-printed replicas of dinosaurs.

“3D printing will be a step change in the science of palaeontology once the costs come down,” says Louise Leakey, who runs a virtual fossil museum, AfricanFossils.org, in conjunction with the Turkana Basin Institute and the National Museum of Kenya in Nairobi.

The method relies on an updated version of a technique called photogrammetry, which calculates the geometry of an object from photographs. To capture a 2-million-year-old Homo habilis skull, for instance, some 160 photographs of the specimen are taken from all angles. Photogrammetry software converts the images into a 3D mesh model, which can then be printed. With a CT scanner, which uses X-rays, you don’t even need to see the object with your own eyes. Fossils can be scanned while still encased in rock. The image is subjected to “virtual preparation” - software processing that digitally removes the surrounding rock.

“You can now use laser scanners to capture surface detail of delicate fossils in the field in 3D before they are excavated to provide an in situ record of a fossil or a site before it is disturbed,” says Leakey. She is the daughter of the palaeontologist Richard Leakey, and granddaughter of Mary and Louis Leakey, famous for their discoveries of ancient hominids in Olduvai Gorge in northern Kenya. Scanning and excavation on a fossil of a snake skeleton in the ground at Lake Turkana will start in June.

3D printing will be a boon for classrooms too, as accurate digital replicas can be made of the rare and inaccessible specimens that make up the fossil collections in museums, without the expense of traditional casting techniques.

I want one of these. 

#science  #paleontology  #archaeology  

astronomy-to-zoology:

Sickle-billed Vanga (Falculea palliata)

is a species of bird found in  the tropical dry forests/shrublands of western Madagascar. The sickle bill is the largest species in the vagna family at 13 inches long. It gets its name from its 3 inch long decurved bill which it uses to eat insects and small vertebrates, by probing holes, filling the niche of woodpeckers (madagascar has none). Sickle bills are a social animals and will travel in groups of 30-50 birds, either with their own or mixed species.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Passeriformes-Vangidae-Falculea-palliata

Source,Source

#science  

It’s not Stephen Hawking’s birthday anymore, so

#stephen hawking  #gif  #science  #astronomy  #physics  #duckface  

Did Neil Armstrong Lie About His Famous Line?

"That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."

It’s one of the 20th century’s most famous lines, but what if Neil Armstrong lied about when it was composed?

The Apollo 11 astronaut was quoted in a 2005 biography as saying he formulated the line while en route to the moon, NBC News reported. But Armstrong’s brother Dean said in a new BBC documentary that it was written long before the astronaut’s boots ever touched moon dust.

#neil armstrong  #astronauts  #NASA  #space  #science  #huffpost  

ohpsychology:

MRI SCAN OF A PATIENT FROM HEAD TO FEET

ohpsychology:

MRI SCAN OF A PATIENT FROM HEAD TO FEET

#science  #mri scans  #psychology  #neuroscience  

Science: So easy a baby can do it.

Science: So easy a baby can do it.

#science  

neuraldamage:

From the Illustrated Birth Control Manual, Valeria Hopkins Parker M.D., Cadillac Publishing Co., 1957

These vintage medical illustrations are so neat.

neuraldamage:

From the Illustrated Birth Control Manual, Valeria Hopkins Parker M.D., Cadillac Publishing Co., 1957

These vintage medical illustrations are so neat.

#science  #art  

freshphotons:

“In its natural environment, Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts that grow on sugar-rich substrates such as fermenting fruit. Fruits, however, also harbor toxic microbes, and flies need to distinguish those microbes that are safe and nutritious from the harmful ones. In this issue, Stensmyr et al. (pp. 1345–1357) demonstrate that flies detect toxic molds by sensing a volatile compound called geosmin, which exclusively triggers a dedicated signaling pathway in the flies’ olfactory system. This circuit, upon activation, causes innate aversion and also prevents egg laying and feeding. Cover concept by Rakel and Marcus Stensmyr. Clay modeling and photo by Marcus Stensmyr.”

freshphotons:

“In its natural environment, Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts that grow on sugar-rich substrates such as fermenting fruit. Fruits, however, also harbor toxic microbes, and flies need to distinguish those microbes that are safe and nutritious from the harmful ones. In this issue, Stensmyr et al. (pp. 1345–1357) demonstrate that flies detect toxic molds by sensing a volatile compound called geosmin, which exclusively triggers a dedicated signaling pathway in the flies’ olfactory system. This circuit, upon activation, causes innate aversion and also prevents egg laying and feeding. Cover concept by Rakel and Marcus Stensmyr. Clay modeling and photo by Marcus Stensmyr.”

#science  #cell biology  

sciencenote:


Dr. Christian Klämbt and Dr. Imke Schmidt
University of Münster, Münster, Germany Specimen: Beta-tubulin expression of a Drosophila third instar larval brain, with attached eye imaginal discs. Technique: Confocal microscopy

Magical.

sciencenote:

Dr. Christian Klämbt and Dr. Imke Schmidt

University of Münster, Münster, Germany
Specimen: Beta-tubulin expression of a Drosophila third instar larval brain, with attached eye imaginal discs.
Technique: Confocal microscopy

Magical.

#science  #photography  

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft snapped this gorgeous, newly-released image of Saturn.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft snapped this gorgeous, newly-released image of Saturn.

#NASA  #Cassini  #Saturn  #astronomy  #planets  #space  #science  #news  #huffpost